Posts Tagged ‘trillion’

“As the Financial Times reported yesterday, more than 1 million U.S. consumers are ‘at least two months behind on car loan repayments,’ noting that the delinquency rate in the $1.1 trillion market hit its highest level since 2009. And that’s not just limited to subprime borrowers. That figure includes everyone with a U.S. car loan….

The financial Times also cites, ‘Delinquencies on credit cards also rose by about the same amount over the period to 1.79% – the highest since 2011. The rise in bad loans comes despite persistently low borrowing costs and unemployment levels – suggesting lenders may be letting consumers take on bigger debt burdens than they can handle.

Lending to consumers with weak credit scores has been one of the fastest-growing parts of the industry. Still, the increased delinquency levels follow a period of rapid expansion and could be a natural consequence of that growth. Separate figures published on Thursday by the New York Federal Reserve showed the total amount of debt held by American households rose last year at the fastest clip since 2007.'” -Porter Stansberry

“At more than $1.4 trillion in loans outstanding, student loan debt is nearly four times bigger than all the debts of Greece.  And it’s still growing at nearly 20% a year… multiple times faster than the official rate of inflation.  Worse, the government’s own data has showed as much as 30% of this debt – nearly one out of every three loans – isn’t being paid or is already in default….

At more than 1,000 schools – representing about one-quarter of all U.S. colleges and trade schools – more than half of students have already defaulted or failed to pay even one dollar toward these loans within seven years of leaving school.  Across all schools, the data show as many as 40% of borrowers haven’t paid a single dollar toward these loans within seven years.  Looking at just the past three years, this number jumps to more than half – 54% – suggesting this problem is only getting worse, not better.

In other words, according to the government’s own data, at least 40% of this debt – representing more than $500 BILLION that has been packaged up, ‘securitized’, and sold to investors as ‘money good’ – will likely never be paid back at all.” -Porter Stansberry

“…the world has been binging on debt like never before.

The International Monetary Fund reported last month that total nonfinancial-sector debt has ballooned to an all-time record of $152 trillion… while the global debt-to-GDP ratio has also soared to an all-time high of 225%, up from 200% just 14 years ago.

Worse, we’re seeing record debt at the government level, the corporate level, and the consumer level (via auto and student loans, in particular). The boom in corporate borrowing is especially concerning…

U.S. companies have already borrowed $1.4 trillion this year to date, according to data firm Dealogic. This is on pace to shatter last year’s previous all-time record of $1.5 trillion.

Unfortunately, most are using this money to refinance existing loans… buy back stock and pay dividends… and finance expensive (and often questionable) mergers and acquisitions. This will do little to help the economy. But it greatly increases leverage… and risk.” -Justin Brill

“Speaking of debt, the International Monetary Fund (“IMF”) reported yesterday that total nonfinancial-sector debt has ballooned to $152 trillion worldwide.  This is the most in history.  The IMF says global debt-to-GDP has also soared to an all-time high of 225%, up from 200% just 14 years ago.” -Justin Brill

The U.S. national debt ($19.5 trillion) is:

  • Larger than the 500 largest American companies (S&P 500) combined ($19.1 trillion)
  • Larger than the total combined assets of the world’s top seven money managers ($18.9 trillion)
  • 25 times larger than the value of all oil exported globally in a year ($786 billion)
  • 155 times larger than the value of all gold mined in the world in a year ($125 billion)

“Sound principles of banking are identical to sound principles of warehousing any kind of merchandise, whether it’s autos, potatoes, or books. Or money. There’s nothing mysterious about sound banking. But banking all over the world has been fundamentally unsound since government-sponsored central banks came to dominate the financial system.  Banking all over the world now operates on a “fractional reserve” system.  A banker can lend out a dollar, which a businessman might use to buy a widget. When that seller of the widget re-deposits the dollar, a banker can lend it out with interest again. The good news for the banker is that his earnings are compounded several times over. The bad news is that, because of the pyramided leverage, a default can cascade.

In 1934, to restore confidence in commercial banks, the U.S. government instituted the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) deposit insurance….  FDIC insurance covers about $9.3 trillion of deposits, but the institution has assets of only $25 billion. That’s less than one cent on the dollar.” -Doug Casey