Posts Tagged ‘student loans’

  • Despite the long bull market, more Americans today have more debt than money in the bank than at any point since 1962, according to Deutsche Bank.
  • American household savings levels are at levels last seen in December 2007… right before the economy slipped into a recession that spurred the global financial crisis.
  • And total U.S. consumer debt – credit cards, auto loans, and student loans – just surged by the most in two years to $3.8 trillion.
  • And government debt is creeping toward a $1 trillion deficit per year. The national debt has topped $20 trillion.

 

If these folks can’t save or make their payments in a strong economy… how will they do it when interest rates go up and the next inevitable recession hits?

The answer is that they won’t.

-Steve Longenecker

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“HOUSEHOLD DEBT AND CREDIT REPORT (Q1 2017)
Household Debt Reaches New Peak Driven by Gains in Mortgage, Auto, and Student Debt
The CMD’s latest Quarterly Report on Household Debt and Credit reveals that total household debt achieved a new peak in the first quarter of 2017, rising by $149 billion to $12.73 trillion—$50 billion above the previous peak reached in the third quarter of 2008. Balances climbed in several areas: mortgages, 1.7 percent; auto loans, 0.9 percent; and student loans, 2.6 percent. Credit card balances fell 1.9 percent this quarter.” -Federal Reserve Bank of New York

“…the world has been binging on debt like never before.

The International Monetary Fund reported last month that total nonfinancial-sector debt has ballooned to an all-time record of $152 trillion… while the global debt-to-GDP ratio has also soared to an all-time high of 225%, up from 200% just 14 years ago.

Worse, we’re seeing record debt at the government level, the corporate level, and the consumer level (via auto and student loans, in particular). The boom in corporate borrowing is especially concerning…

U.S. companies have already borrowed $1.4 trillion this year to date, according to data firm Dealogic. This is on pace to shatter last year’s previous all-time record of $1.5 trillion.

Unfortunately, most are using this money to refinance existing loans… buy back stock and pay dividends… and finance expensive (and often questionable) mergers and acquisitions. This will do little to help the economy. But it greatly increases leverage… and risk.” -Justin Brill