Posts Tagged ‘spend’

“‘If I were given $1 million’
According to the respondents, here are some of the things people would do if they suddenly received an influx of cash…

  • 54% of respondents would spend it

According to Charles Schwab, Americans are paying attention to their friends’ personal-finance choices. Sixty percent of people said they’ve wondered how others on social media were able to afford things like expensive trips… And out of a variety of factors (including family, friends, and co-workers), social media was reported to have the worst influence on money management…

A whopping 59% said they live paycheck to paycheck, and 44% carry a credit-card balance or struggle to keep up with payments, according to Charles Schwab.” -The Crux

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“People spend on big items…. And then they try to save by not going to Starbucks.  Don’t let the myths of society rule your spending.” -James Altucher

“Tom and Kate know they have a serious debt problem…

They spend their lives in a constant state of stress – trying to figure out ways to juggle their debt. They consistently live beyond their means. The only thing that limits their spending is the limit on their credit cards.

Tom and Kate are in the top 15% of U.S. households, bringing home a combined $160,000 per year. Yet like many people, they’re deeply in debt… spending everything they make and borrowing even more.”

-Bill McGilton

“Money is more than ‘just money’. It’s a way of keeping score and staying honest. When we spend money, we make choices. We accept trade-offs, taking real time and resources that could have been used elsewhere. And we have to ask – is it worth it?” -Bill Bonner

“Opportunity cost is the one biggest cost in all of our lives. We spend it like there’s no tomorrow.
And guess what? Eventually there’s no tomorrow.” -James Altucher

“So many people spend so much time worrying about elections and the economy. They miss so much of what is really going on around them in their own families, the things that really matter. We miss a lot… simply because we are not here.” -Unknown

“A recent survey showed that more than 40% of Baby Boomers (those born between 1946 and 1964) have less than $100,000 in retirement savings. That means those right at the retirement window won’t be able to maintain the lifestyle they want once they retire. You might think Social Security will help. Think again – the average monthly Social Security check in 2018 is just $1,404….

Reverse Mortgage Recap:

In a typical mortgage, you obtain a loan for the purchased real estate and then slowly, over the life of the loan, pay it back to the bank. The reverse mortgage works exactly the opposite… We get the bank to pay us while our health is good, and we don’t have to pay it back until we die or move out of the home.

Once approved, you can receive your loan money in several ways. You can take the money as a lump sum, a stream of payments, a line of credit, or a combination of the three.

Reverse Mortgage Precautions:

Depending on how you receive your reverse mortgage payment or payments, you could risk losing your eligibility for Medicaid.

Maybe you aren’t thinking about Medicaid just yet. After all, Medicare covers a wide range of health services. Here’s the kicker: Medicare only covers short-term care in a skilled nursing facility or rehabilitation care in a nursing facility. Medicare will not cover any long-term care, including care at a nursing home.

That’s where Medicaid comes in. Medicaid is the primary payer for nursing-home care in the U.S.

That means if you take out a reverse mortgage now and suffer a stroke two months later, you might not qualify for Medicaid and will have to pay out-of-pocket for all your nursing-home care.

Taking a lump sum payment or getting monthly payments that you don’t exhaust each month (meaning you’re building up your savings account) triggers something called the spend-down rule.

Basically, you only qualify for Medicaid if you meet the financial requirements. In other words, if you have too much money in your bank account, Medicaid expects you to spend that on your care before you qualify for assistance. You have to “spend down” what you have to reach that point.

And keep in mind, nursing-home care runs up the bill. In 2016, the national average for a shared room in a nursing home was $225 per day. That’s more than $82,000 a year.

The second consideration for taking out a reverse mortgage is the possibility of moving. If you don’t live in your home for at least one year (for instance, if you’re in a long-term care facility) or if you sell the home, the loan would come due. That means paying it back in full….

Also, if the housing market drops or your home loses value for any reason, you might not be able to sell it for the full amount of the loan. In that case, you’d have to make up the difference….”

-Dr. David Eifrig