Posts Tagged ‘paid’

More Pay

Posted: September 15, 2018 in Money Matters, Thought for the Day
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"If you want to be paid more or promoted faster, you have to increase the value 
of the work that you do." -Brian Tracy
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“According to data from Experian’s File One and Credit.com, Americans die with an average of $62,000 in debt… mortgage debt, credit card debt, auto loans, and more.

Some people think that when you die, your debt dies with you. But in most cases, that’s not true… That debt will need to be paid….

Creditors for secured debt – like mortgages – get first dibs on your estate. Once all that debt is paid off, anything remaining goes to unsecured debt… things like credit cards and medical bills.

Planning for your own death might be uncomfortable, but proper estate planning is important…. So make sure you’re thinking about everything you’ll leave behind… debts included.”

-Laura Bente

“The way we treat retirees in this nation is broken…

When the government created Social Security, it was as an anti-poverty insurance program… not a way to pay for your entire retirement. In fact, it began with only a 2% payroll tax and promised to never take more than 6% of a worker’s pay.

That promise was broken.

Today, Social Security takes a combined total of 12.4% of your pay.

And what do you get guaranteed in return?

Nothing.

According to the Social Security Administration’s own website, the Supreme Court ruled in 1960 that citizens have no legal rights to Social Security, no matter how long they paid into the system.

Social Security’s costs this year exceeded its income for the first time since 1982.”

-P.J. O’Rourke

Debt Relations

Posted: April 23, 2018 in Debt
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“When considering entering a debt relationship, one should always ask himself, ‘Who issued the debt? What is it really worth? What is the likelihood that I’ll get paid?’” -Jeff Thomas

“At more than $1.4 trillion in loans outstanding, student loan debt is nearly four times bigger than all the debts of Greece.  And it’s still growing at nearly 20% a year… multiple times faster than the official rate of inflation.  Worse, the government’s own data has showed as much as 30% of this debt – nearly one out of every three loans – isn’t being paid or is already in default….

At more than 1,000 schools – representing about one-quarter of all U.S. colleges and trade schools – more than half of students have already defaulted or failed to pay even one dollar toward these loans within seven years of leaving school.  Across all schools, the data show as many as 40% of borrowers haven’t paid a single dollar toward these loans within seven years.  Looking at just the past three years, this number jumps to more than half – 54% – suggesting this problem is only getting worse, not better.

In other words, according to the government’s own data, at least 40% of this debt – representing more than $500 BILLION that has been packaged up, ‘securitized’, and sold to investors as ‘money good’ – will likely never be paid back at all.” -Porter Stansberry

I don’t have an iPhone… or a blingy Suburban…  But I probably have one thing these conspicuous consumers don’t: The house I live in is fully paid for.  I handle my money differently.  I could buy an iPhone or a Suburban tomorrow.  I wouldn’t need a penny of debt to do it.  But I won’t… Why?  Because I know those things won’t make me the slightest bit happier.  I’d be the same dolt I was before.” -Steve Sjuggerud

The investment-advisory industry is a huge, multi-billion dollar business based on hard work, clever thinking, and sophisticated algorithms….  [T]he unfortunate truth is that the financial establishment rarely looks beyond stocks and bonds.  And if you think about it, why would it want to?  It makes its money by ushering you from one ‘hot’ stock or ‘amazing’ fund to the next….  Because they know that you have heard that ‘diversification of assets’ is good, financial advisers give you the illusion of diversification by filling your stock portfolio with businesses that are ‘diversified’….  But at the end of the day, it’s all invested in stocks or stock derivatives.

Asset allocation is the process by which you spread your wealth across different sorts of investments….  Over the years, I have made hundreds of individual financial decisions….  I could see very clearly that it was not particular buy/sell decisions that accounted for this good fortune.  It was the general decisions about asset allocation that paid off.” -Mark Ford