Posts Tagged ‘monetary’

“The definition of inflation is simple. It’s a general rise in the price level….  So you can…think about inflation not as a rise in prices, but as a change in the value of money. When the value of money changes, other things will rise or fall in price.

That’s the definition. Measuring inflation is much more complicated….

We’re concerned with general inflation as a monetary phenomenon. Health care and college prices will keep rising, we’re sure. But the cost of everything else rising is the true threat…” -David Eifrig

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“Traditionally, inflation has been defined as ‘an increase in the amount of currency in circulation’….   Unfortunately, in recent decades, even dictionaries have been offering a revised definition of inflation, as ‘an increase in the price of goods and services’….

The purpose of bank-created inflation is to extract wealth from the populace.  By regularly increasing the amount of currency in circulation, banks create an environment in which the concept of debt appears to be beneficial. As a result, virtually everyone in today’s society not only has debt; he actually believes that he couldn’t improve his life except through debt….  In essence, the inflation concept was invented by banks as an invisible tax—a means by which they could extract wealth from the populace.

In effect, the individual is used by the banking system as a milk cow. For his entire working life, inflation is carefully adjusted to extract as much monetary value from his labours as possible, whilst still leaving him capable of continued production….

Refuse to borrow money for any situation. Yes, it will mean that, as your friends show off their new cars, you’ll be driving an older model. They’ll also live in nicer houses than you and they’ll ‘own’ their own house before you do. But, at some point, since you’re free from debt, you’ll pass them by and eventually retire well.

By understanding inflation, and acting on that understanding, the odds of living your life as a milk cow can be greatly diminished.”

-Jeff Thomas

“In the United States neither paper currency nor deposits have value as commodities.  Intrinsically, a dollar bill is just a piece of paper….  What, then, makes these instruments…acceptable at face value in payment of all debts and for other monetary uses?  Mainly, it is the confidence people have that they will be able to exchange such money for other financial assets and for real goods and services whenever they choose to do so.  Money, like anything else, derives its value from its scarcity in relation to its usefulness….  Money’s usefulness is its unique ability to command other goods and services and to permit a holder to be constantly ready to do so.” -Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago

“…the world has been binging on debt like never before.

The International Monetary Fund reported last month that total nonfinancial-sector debt has ballooned to an all-time record of $152 trillion… while the global debt-to-GDP ratio has also soared to an all-time high of 225%, up from 200% just 14 years ago.

Worse, we’re seeing record debt at the government level, the corporate level, and the consumer level (via auto and student loans, in particular). The boom in corporate borrowing is especially concerning…

U.S. companies have already borrowed $1.4 trillion this year to date, according to data firm Dealogic. This is on pace to shatter last year’s previous all-time record of $1.5 trillion.

Unfortunately, most are using this money to refinance existing loans… buy back stock and pay dividends… and finance expensive (and often questionable) mergers and acquisitions. This will do little to help the economy. But it greatly increases leverage… and risk.” -Justin Brill