Posts Tagged ‘lending’

“The married couple of 20 years is just a step away from financial disaster….

Millions of over-leveraged consumers – who can’t distinguish between a ‘want’ and a ‘need’, refuse to live within their means, require a certain standard of living, and use most of their available credit without knowing when or how they’ll pay it off – are a big credit risk. They live on the edge of default….

Inevitably, irresponsible lending always leads to a bust….  Credit-card debt is growing so fast, it’s even outpacing strong wage growth….

Trouble is brewing… It’s only a matter of time before this recklessness blows up.” -Bill McGilton

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“Americans have almost no control over their own capital. And if you don’t use capital under your ownership and control, you will rely on those who do. This is fundamentally why so many purchases in today’s economy are financed through third-party lending.” -Ryan Griggs

“As the Financial Times reported yesterday, more than 1 million U.S. consumers are ‘at least two months behind on car loan repayments,’ noting that the delinquency rate in the $1.1 trillion market hit its highest level since 2009. And that’s not just limited to subprime borrowers. That figure includes everyone with a U.S. car loan….

The financial Times also cites, ‘Delinquencies on credit cards also rose by about the same amount over the period to 1.79% – the highest since 2011. The rise in bad loans comes despite persistently low borrowing costs and unemployment levels – suggesting lenders may be letting consumers take on bigger debt burdens than they can handle.

Lending to consumers with weak credit scores has been one of the fastest-growing parts of the industry. Still, the increased delinquency levels follow a period of rapid expansion and could be a natural consequence of that growth. Separate figures published on Thursday by the New York Federal Reserve showed the total amount of debt held by American households rose last year at the fastest clip since 2007.'” -Porter Stansberry

Sweden, Denmark, and Switzerland all have negative interest rates.  Negative interest rates mean the lender literally pays the borrower for the privilege of lending him money. It’s a bizarre, upside-down concept.  But negative rates are not some European anomaly.  The Federal Reserve discussed the possibility of using negative interest rates in the U.S. at its last meeting.  When you deposit money in a bank, you are lending money to the bank.  However, with negative rates, you don’t earn interest.  Instead, you pay the bank.” -Nick Giambruno

Money Supply

Posted: June 27, 2015 in Economics
Tags: , , , ,

“Banks are responsible for creating roughly 90% of the money supply.  They do this by simply lending money into existence.” –Bill Bonner

A private reserve strategy is not only the ideal way to finance personal capital purchases, but also fights the damaging effects of the inflationary practices of the commercial lending sector. (see How Privatized Banking Really Works)