Posts Tagged ‘dollar’

“The eagerness to spend more casually and live a noticeably rich lifestyle gets more intense with each generation. Put simply, earning a dollar yourself tends to make a person a little more cognizant about how that dollar is spent.” -Natalie Schmook

Advertisements

“Americans feel squeezed because the cost of rent, medical insurance, and tuition – as well as other basic living expenses – is rising much faster than their wages. This creates very real problems for ordinary people.

By every measure – including stagnating wages and rising costs – things have been going downhill for the American middle class since the early 1970s. August 15, 1971, to be exact. This is the date President Nixon killed the last remnants of the gold standard. Since then, the dollar has been a pure fiat currency.

The rejection of sound money is the primary reason why inflation has eaten up wage growth since the early 1970s – and the primary reason why the cost of living has exploded.

Measured in gold, wages in the U.S. have fallen over 84% since 1971…. Priced in gold, the minimum wage has fallen 87% since 1968. Note that the federal minimum hourly wage was $1.60 in 1968. It’s $7.25 today, or 353% higher in dollar terms. But that $7.25 buys 87% less than $1.60 did back in 1968. That’s the story you won’t hear from the mainstream press.

Inflation follows a clear a pattern of corruption:  In a fiat currency system, the government will invariably print an ever-increasing amount of currency. This makes prices and the cost of living rise faster than wages. The average person feels the pain, but doesn’t understand what’s happening. More people support politicians who promise freebies. In order to pay for the ‘freebies,’ the government prints more money. This creates even more inflation, and the cycle repeats.”

-Nick Giambruno

Who Owes?

Posted: April 22, 2018 in Debt
Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

“The dollar (since going off the gold standard) an ‘I owe you nothing’.  The euro as a ‘Who owes you nothing’?  Cryptos can accurately be described as ‘You have no idea who owes you nothing’.” -Doug Casey

undefined

“Here’s a chart based on research from the Economic Policy Institute that describes the problem. As you can see, productivity in this country grew nearly 250% between 1948 and 2014, but median wages only grew 109%…You’ll also notice that the divergence begins around 1971… the year President Nixon removed the U.S. dollar from gold.

Why? Because paper money doesn’t transmit gains in productivity like real, sound money should.

In short, when the dollar was unlinked from gold, the government was granted the ability to create unlimited amounts of new money. But this money doesn’t flow to everyone equally. It is created in the banks, and then works its way through the financial system before eventually trickling down through the real economy. The result is that asset and consumer prices have risen far faster than wages.” -Justin Brill

“In the United States neither paper currency nor deposits have value as commodities.  Intrinsically, a dollar bill is just a piece of paper….  What, then, makes these instruments…acceptable at face value in payment of all debts and for other monetary uses?  Mainly, it is the confidence people have that they will be able to exchange such money for other financial assets and for real goods and services whenever they choose to do so.  Money, like anything else, derives its value from its scarcity in relation to its usefulness….  Money’s usefulness is its unique ability to command other goods and services and to permit a holder to be constantly ready to do so.” -Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago

“At more than $1.4 trillion in loans outstanding, student loan debt is nearly four times bigger than all the debts of Greece.  And it’s still growing at nearly 20% a year… multiple times faster than the official rate of inflation.  Worse, the government’s own data has showed as much as 30% of this debt – nearly one out of every three loans – isn’t being paid or is already in default….

At more than 1,000 schools – representing about one-quarter of all U.S. colleges and trade schools – more than half of students have already defaulted or failed to pay even one dollar toward these loans within seven years of leaving school.  Across all schools, the data show as many as 40% of borrowers haven’t paid a single dollar toward these loans within seven years.  Looking at just the past three years, this number jumps to more than half – 54% – suggesting this problem is only getting worse, not better.

In other words, according to the government’s own data, at least 40% of this debt – representing more than $500 BILLION that has been packaged up, ‘securitized’, and sold to investors as ‘money good’ – will likely never be paid back at all.” -Porter Stansberry

The investment-advisory industry is a huge, multi-billion dollar business based on hard work, clever thinking, and sophisticated algorithms….  [T]he unfortunate truth is that the financial establishment rarely looks beyond stocks and bonds.  And if you think about it, why would it want to?  It makes its money by ushering you from one ‘hot’ stock or ‘amazing’ fund to the next….  Because they know that you have heard that ‘diversification of assets’ is good, financial advisers give you the illusion of diversification by filling your stock portfolio with businesses that are ‘diversified’….  But at the end of the day, it’s all invested in stocks or stock derivatives.

Asset allocation is the process by which you spread your wealth across different sorts of investments….  Over the years, I have made hundreds of individual financial decisions….  I could see very clearly that it was not particular buy/sell decisions that accounted for this good fortune.  It was the general decisions about asset allocation that paid off.” -Mark Ford