Posts Tagged ‘crisis’

“In the final quarter of 2018, U.S. credit-card debt reached $870 billion – outpacing the recession – according to Bloomberg. The U.S. has added 100 million credit cards to its circulation since the financial crisis…there are nearly twice as many credit cards in use as there are adults to use them.” -The Crux

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Leveraged Loans defined:

“…arranged by a syndicate of banks, to companies that are heavily indebted or have weak credit ratings.” -IMF

“…are effectively provided to companies already swimming in debt.” -Nomi Prins

“That was all good and well when interest rates were super low, making it easier for companies to borrow oodles of money,”

“This year, leveraged loan issuance reached an annual rate of $745 billion. That’s nearly the same as the prior record of $762 billion in 2007 before the financial crisis and just a bit less than last year’s record of $788 billion globally.”

Public pensions nationwide are crumbling. Legal loopholes are widening. If you don’t take action to protect yourself and your loved ones, you could be left with nothing….  this is not a hypothetical.

In 2001, the vast majority of pensions were fully funded. Generally speaking, “well-funded” means above 80%. But 50% funding or less is considered the “crisis point.” It’s extremely difficult to come back from 50% or less.

According to a new report from The Pew Charitable Trusts – an independent research organization – pensions in Colorado, Connecticut, Illinois, Kentucky, and New Jersey are less than 50% funded. In fact, New Jersey sits at the bottom of the list… its pension is only 31% funded.

If you’re one of the tens of millions of affected Americans, you should know… you have zero control over what happens.

But there is a solution….  You can move money from your pension….  This gives you total control of your money.” -David Eifrig

“Consumers now own a mountain of credit-card debt in excess of $1 trillion – the highest level since before the 2008 financial crisis.  Meanwhile, the savings rate for consumers dropped to just 2.9% as of November, versus nearly 6% just two years ago. The only time Americans have been saving less than today was 1929-1931 – during the peak of the Great Depression.  In other words, Americans are borrowing more and saving less than virtually any time in history.  How long can that last?” -P.J. O’Rourke
  • Despite the long bull market, more Americans today have more debt than money in the bank than at any point since 1962, according to Deutsche Bank.
  • American household savings levels are at levels last seen in December 2007… right before the economy slipped into a recession that spurred the global financial crisis.
  • And total U.S. consumer debt – credit cards, auto loans, and student loans – just surged by the most in two years to $3.8 trillion.
  • And government debt is creeping toward a $1 trillion deficit per year. The national debt has topped $20 trillion.

 

If these folks can’t save or make their payments in a strong economy… how will they do it when interest rates go up and the next inevitable recession hits?

The answer is that they won’t.

-Steve Longenecker

Debt Crisis

Posted: April 19, 2014 in Debt
Tags: , , ,

“How can you solve a debt crisis by creating more debt? I think a 10 year old can figure that out.” -Harry S. Dent

Well, here we ago again.  Up until now, most of the “questionable” home loans available since the housing meltdown have been rural development loans offered through the USDA.  The questionable part in my mind are the “no down payment required” and “guaranteed loan” aspects.  But, according to a Reuters article, Wells Fargo is again planning to jump back into the “subprime” market.  Why?  Because they are experiencing a downturn in revenue.  Hmm, does this seem like a sound business decision?  (GM is also selling cars to subprime customers to help their sales).  Does this sound promising?

Some interesting points from the Reuters article makes me scratch my head:

1.  “…loosening of credit standards could boost housing demand…”  Shouldn’t demand for housing be boosted because people can actually afford them?  Isn’t it a false demand by any other standard?

2.  “To avoid the taint associated with the word ‘subprime’, lenders are calling their loans ‘another chance mortgages’ or ‘alternative mortgage program’.”  Does changing the name of something actually make it better?  Does duping people make these mortgages safer?

3.  “If the borrower does not meet those hurdles and later defaults on a mortgage, he or she can sue the lender and argue the loan should never have been made in the first place.”  Seriously, then why do we make the purchaser sign on the bottom line?  That point was missed during the initial crisis; purchasers were simply considered victims.  Everyone wants to blame the bank.  Thank you Dodd-Frank!

4.  “Subprime mortgages were at the center of the financial crisis, but many lenders believe that done with proper controls, the risks can be managed.”  I am sure they thought the same thing last time.  Risk is guaranteed to be risky; a la the recent death of the snake handling pastor.

5.  “The bank is looking to lend to borrowers with weaker credit, but only if those mortgages can be guaranteed by the FHA.  Because the loans are backed by the government, Wells Fargo can package them into bonds and sell them to investors.”  And there we have it!  Guaranteed by the government!  In other words, by the American taxpayer!  Let’s see, what would I provide to the American consumer if the government will guarantee it?  Anything!  The second part of the quote explains exactly what they were doing before, turning them into investments.  Subprime investments,  I’ll pass.

It looks like the strategy must be paying dividends.  According to the Wall Street Journal, “Household debt jumps as banks loosen up.”  Wells Fargo knows what works to get people borrowing.  The interesting thing is that they still haven’t resolved all of their issues with Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac from the original crisis, but see no issues with stepping back into those familiar waters.

All I can say is, good luck with that….