Posts Tagged ‘consumer’

“Since we are not taught to strategically accumulate capital, we rely on the capital of those individuals and institutions who do. We borrow from investors, banks, mortgage lenders, credit card and consumer credit companies in order to pay for the things we need.” -Ryan Griggs

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“It’s EZ credit that is the linchpin in today’s fake-money system.

The Deep State’s stocks, bonds, and real estate values… not to mention its careers, incomes, and reputations… depend on it.

And it is made possible by the China trade… by Chinese workers who put in long hours in miserable conditions in order to stock the shelves of Walmart with cheap goods… by Chinese manufacturers who undersell their competitors to keep consumer price inflation in the U.S. at low levels… and by Bank of China, which holds some $1.25 trillion worth of U.S. bonds… thus propping up the whole wobbly capital structure….

In politics and economics, BS is all there is. The calculations are almost always fake; the statistics are quackery; the theories are devilish nonsense. And bad ideas never entirely disappear, they just re-emerge after a few years… often dressed in new duds.”

-Bill Bonner

“You’ll never guess what’s leading consumer debt higher now, at this stage in the cycle… mortgages… specifically, a new type of Fannie and Freddie mortgage product. It’s called ‘The Conventional 97’. It only requires a 3% down payment.

What’s ‘conventional’ about this kind of loan? Nothing, of course. No private lender would ever make a loan like this where the lender is taking all of the risk.” -Porter Stansberry

“If you add up all of our government, corporate, and consumer debt, America owes roughly $70 trillion…. that adds up to about $836,000 per American household…

The United States has become the largest debtor in human history.  The obvious question is: Why on Earth did so many people borrow so much money they have no hope of ever repaying?” 

-Porter Stansberry

 

  • Despite the long bull market, more Americans today have more debt than money in the bank than at any point since 1962, according to Deutsche Bank.
  • American household savings levels are at levels last seen in December 2007… right before the economy slipped into a recession that spurred the global financial crisis.
  • And total U.S. consumer debt – credit cards, auto loans, and student loans – just surged by the most in two years to $3.8 trillion.
  • And government debt is creeping toward a $1 trillion deficit per year. The national debt has topped $20 trillion.

 

If these folks can’t save or make their payments in a strong economy… how will they do it when interest rates go up and the next inevitable recession hits?

The answer is that they won’t.

-Steve Longenecker

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“Here’s a chart based on research from the Economic Policy Institute that describes the problem. As you can see, productivity in this country grew nearly 250% between 1948 and 2014, but median wages only grew 109%…You’ll also notice that the divergence begins around 1971… the year President Nixon removed the U.S. dollar from gold.

Why? Because paper money doesn’t transmit gains in productivity like real, sound money should.

In short, when the dollar was unlinked from gold, the government was granted the ability to create unlimited amounts of new money. But this money doesn’t flow to everyone equally. It is created in the banks, and then works its way through the financial system before eventually trickling down through the real economy. The result is that asset and consumer prices have risen far faster than wages.” -Justin Brill

“…the world has been binging on debt like never before.

The International Monetary Fund reported last month that total nonfinancial-sector debt has ballooned to an all-time record of $152 trillion… while the global debt-to-GDP ratio has also soared to an all-time high of 225%, up from 200% just 14 years ago.

Worse, we’re seeing record debt at the government level, the corporate level, and the consumer level (via auto and student loans, in particular). The boom in corporate borrowing is especially concerning…

U.S. companies have already borrowed $1.4 trillion this year to date, according to data firm Dealogic. This is on pace to shatter last year’s previous all-time record of $1.5 trillion.

Unfortunately, most are using this money to refinance existing loans… buy back stock and pay dividends… and finance expensive (and often questionable) mergers and acquisitions. This will do little to help the economy. But it greatly increases leverage… and risk.” -Justin Brill