Posts Tagged ‘average’

“Economics deals with the real actions of real men. Its [laws] refer neither to ideal nor to perfect men, neither to the phantom of a fabulous economic man (homoeconomicus) nor to the statistical notion of an average man. . . . Man with all his weaknesses and limitations, every man as he lives and acts, is the subject matter of [economics].”
—Ludwig von Mises

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“The U.S. 10-year bond yield rose to a seven-year high of 3.24% – nearly 2% above its bottom in July 2016.

This 2% increase, imposed on $68 trillion of debt, is equal to an extra $1.3 trillion in interest charges….

To look at it another way, the typical working person who works an average of 33 hours per week earns $26 an hour. His percentage of the total debt is about $500,000.

At today’s interest rate, he will have to work 558 hours – or three and a half weeks (not including taxes) – just to keep up with the interest payments. Clearly, this is impossible…” -Bill Bonner

“A recent survey showed that more than 40% of Baby Boomers (those born between 1946 and 1964) have less than $100,000 in retirement savings. That means those right at the retirement window won’t be able to maintain the lifestyle they want once they retire. You might think Social Security will help. Think again – the average monthly Social Security check in 2018 is just $1,404….

Reverse Mortgage Recap:

In a typical mortgage, you obtain a loan for the purchased real estate and then slowly, over the life of the loan, pay it back to the bank. The reverse mortgage works exactly the opposite… We get the bank to pay us while our health is good, and we don’t have to pay it back until we die or move out of the home.

Once approved, you can receive your loan money in several ways. You can take the money as a lump sum, a stream of payments, a line of credit, or a combination of the three.

Reverse Mortgage Precautions:

Depending on how you receive your reverse mortgage payment or payments, you could risk losing your eligibility for Medicaid.

Maybe you aren’t thinking about Medicaid just yet. After all, Medicare covers a wide range of health services. Here’s the kicker: Medicare only covers short-term care in a skilled nursing facility or rehabilitation care in a nursing facility. Medicare will not cover any long-term care, including care at a nursing home.

That’s where Medicaid comes in. Medicaid is the primary payer for nursing-home care in the U.S.

That means if you take out a reverse mortgage now and suffer a stroke two months later, you might not qualify for Medicaid and will have to pay out-of-pocket for all your nursing-home care.

Taking a lump sum payment or getting monthly payments that you don’t exhaust each month (meaning you’re building up your savings account) triggers something called the spend-down rule.

Basically, you only qualify for Medicaid if you meet the financial requirements. In other words, if you have too much money in your bank account, Medicaid expects you to spend that on your care before you qualify for assistance. You have to “spend down” what you have to reach that point.

And keep in mind, nursing-home care runs up the bill. In 2016, the national average for a shared room in a nursing home was $225 per day. That’s more than $82,000 a year.

The second consideration for taking out a reverse mortgage is the possibility of moving. If you don’t live in your home for at least one year (for instance, if you’re in a long-term care facility) or if you sell the home, the loan would come due. That means paying it back in full….

Also, if the housing market drops or your home loses value for any reason, you might not be able to sell it for the full amount of the loan. In that case, you’d have to make up the difference….”

-Dr. David Eifrig

“Americans feel squeezed because the cost of rent, medical insurance, and tuition – as well as other basic living expenses – is rising much faster than their wages. This creates very real problems for ordinary people.

By every measure – including stagnating wages and rising costs – things have been going downhill for the American middle class since the early 1970s. August 15, 1971, to be exact. This is the date President Nixon killed the last remnants of the gold standard. Since then, the dollar has been a pure fiat currency.

The rejection of sound money is the primary reason why inflation has eaten up wage growth since the early 1970s – and the primary reason why the cost of living has exploded.

Measured in gold, wages in the U.S. have fallen over 84% since 1971…. Priced in gold, the minimum wage has fallen 87% since 1968. Note that the federal minimum hourly wage was $1.60 in 1968. It’s $7.25 today, or 353% higher in dollar terms. But that $7.25 buys 87% less than $1.60 did back in 1968. That’s the story you won’t hear from the mainstream press.

Inflation follows a clear a pattern of corruption:  In a fiat currency system, the government will invariably print an ever-increasing amount of currency. This makes prices and the cost of living rise faster than wages. The average person feels the pain, but doesn’t understand what’s happening. More people support politicians who promise freebies. In order to pay for the ‘freebies,’ the government prints more money. This creates even more inflation, and the cycle repeats.”

-Nick Giambruno

Banks are keeping billions of dollars from Americans…  Right now, according to the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, about $350 billion is sitting in brokerage accounts earning an average of 0.12%. That’s about $420 million in interest.  But if all those people with that cash just sitting there moved it to an account earning 1%, the interest earning soars to $3.5 billion a year.  That’s like leaving nearly $3.4 billion in free money on the table.  Make your money work for you.  Stop letting these banks steal your interest.” -David Eifrig

“You are not just the average of the 5 people around you.  You are the average of the:  1) 5 habits you do, 2) 5 foods you eat, 3) 5 ideas you have, and 4) content you consume.” -James Altucher

Escape Average

Posted: January 20, 2017 in Thought for the Day
Tags: , , , ,

“But if you’re going to try to escape from the average, you can’t do what everyone else is doing.” -Chris Mayer